My First Warriors In Pink Mission

May 28, 2014 · 1 comment

My first mission as a Model of Courage for the Warrior’s in Pink was to share my breast cancer story. Since I do not feel it is not my story to tell, I asked one of my best friends from high school to share it. Faryn lost her mother when we were seniors to breast cancer after a long battle with the disease. Through early detection best practices, a healthy diet and active lifestyle, Faryn is doing the best she can to reduce her own risk. While she knows, many young women are not aware that the decisions they are making today effect their chances of developing breast cancer in the near future.

Back then in high school, I didn’t give my own risk much thought. I assumed it only happened to older women who had it in their family. Since I did not, the threat didn’t seem real. After spending a weekend in Sedona, Arizona with 15 survivors, I quickly realized that breast cancer strikes women under 30, men and many with no family history. What’s even more alarming is the research that shows how toxic our lives have become and their effects on our cancer risk profiles, genetics aside.

Each month, I hope to share with you some piece of information that you can use to become a little more aware of your own breast health. For starters, I think all women should know what breasts look like after a mastectomy. Check out these 10 women, modeling bathing suits designed by a breast cancer survivor to show off the “monokini.” The swimsuits reveal the scars while making survivors feel beautiful.

You can check out my WIP MOC profile and purchase your own Warrior’s gear to support the fight against breast cancer here.

Disclaimer: I am not being compensated by Ford for my participation in this campaign. For has provided me with a 2014 Ford Fusion, gas, insurance and admin costs.

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1 Runner Girl Eats May 29, 2014 at 6:19 am

My mom was diagnosed with breast cancer when I was 16 (she was 39). She has now beed cancer free for 12 years but it is still a huge part of our lives. Early detection is key and being aware of risk factors. Can’t wait to read your posts!

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